Blue Note Hank Mobley

Hank Mobley - The Complete Blue Note Hank Mobley Fifties Sessions (1998)

Hank Mobley - The Complete Blue Note Hank Mobley Fifties Sessions (1998)
Jazz, Hard Bop, Saxophone | MP3 320 kbps CBR | 281 min | 919 MB
Label: Mosaic Records | Rel: 1998

This is a typically remarkable box set from Mosaic. The six-CD limited-edition package has all of tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley's recordings as a leader for Blue Note from a three-year period, all of the music originally included in the albums titled The Hank Mobley Quartet, Hank Mobley Sextet, Hank Mobley & His All-Stars, Hank Mobley Quintet, Hank, Hank Mobley, Curtain Call, Poppin', and Peckin' Time; not a lot of imagination went into these records' original titles. There is only one previously unissued selection (the alternate take of "Barrel of Funk"), but two of the albums were only out previously in Japan, and most of the others had not been previously available on CD.

Hank Mobley - Far Away Lands (1988)  Music

Posted by Oceandrop at Nov. 7, 2011
Hank Mobley - Far Away Lands (1988)

Hank Mobley - Far Away Lands (1988)
Jazz | EAC Rip | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG | mp3@320 | 237 MB. & 101 MB.
300dpi. Complete Scans (JPG) included | WinRar, 3% recovery
Audio CD (1988) | Label: Blue Note | Catalog# CDP-7-84425-2 | 35:59 min.

Of all the Blue Note artists of the 1960s, tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley may very well be the most underrated. A consistent player whose style evolved throughout the decade, Mobley wrote a series of inventive and challenging compositions that inspired the all-stars he used on his recordings while remaining in the genre of hard bop. For this lesser-known outing, Mobley teams up with trumpeter Donald Byrd, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Billy Higgins for four of his songs (given such colorful titles as "A Dab of This and That," "No Argument," "The Hippity Hop," and "Bossa for Baby"), along with a song apiece from Byrd and Jimmy Heath. An excellent outing, fairly late in the productive career of Hank Mobley.
Hank Mobley - Third Season (ft. Lee Morgan) (1967) {Blue Note, Ron McMaster}

Hank Mobley - Third Season (ft. Lee Morgan) (1967) {Blue Note, Ron McMaster}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (image)+CUE+LOG -> 273 Mb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (jpg) -> 9 Mb
© 1998 Blue Note / Capitol | 7243 4 97506 2 3 | 20-bit SBM
Jazz / Hard Bop / Saxophone

Tenor saxophonist Hank Mobley recorded frequently for Blue Note in the 1960s (six albums from 1967-1970) and, although overshadowed by the flashier and more avant-garde players, Mobley's output was consistently rewarding. For this overlooked session, which was not issued until 1980 and then finally reissued on CD in 1988, a regular contingent of top Blue Note artists (Mobley, trumpeter Lee Morgan, altoist James Spaulding, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Walter Booker, and drummer Billy Higgins) are joined by a wild card, guitarist Sonny Greenwich.
Hank Mobley - Soul Station (1960) {2009 Audio Wave XRCD24 Remaster} [repost]

Hank Mobley - Soul Station (1960) {2009 Audio Wave XRCD24 Remaster}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 269 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 89 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 242 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24-bit remaster | XRCD24
© 2009 Audio Wave / Blue Note | AWMXR-0001
Jazz / Hard Bop / Saxophone

Leonard Feather once famously described Hank Mobley as 'the middleweight champion of the tenor saxophone.' Middleweights never get much respect. But before drugs and general dissipation got him, Mobley recorded some albums for Blue Note in the 1960s that make time stand still. Soul Station exemplifies the suave, flowing melodicism and erotic rhythmic subtlety that made Mobley unique. With a rhythm section for the ages behind him, Mobley delivers profundities of soul and swing now gone from planet Earth. This Audio Wave reissue uses JVC's XRCD24 mastering and manufacturing technologies and gets you closest to Blue Note's master tapes.
Bobby Hutcherson - Head On (1971) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster TYCJ-81099}

Bobby Hutcherson - Head On (1971) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster TYCJ-81099}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 508 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 186 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 250 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24bit 192kHz remaster
© 1971, 2014 Universal Japan / Blue Note | BN 75th The Masterworks | TYCJ-81099
Jazz / Post Bop / Vibraphone

Features the high-fidelity SHM-CD format (compatible with standard CD player) and 24 bit remastering. Featuring the work of obscure composer/pianist Todd Cochrane, vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson's 1971 album Head On is a highly cerebral and atmospheric affair that is somewhat different than his other equally experimental '70s work. Although the album does feature more of the avant-garde jazz that Hutcherson was exploring during this period, Cochrane's material is heavily influenced by contemporary classical music, and accordingly Head On is more of an exercise in reflective, layered jazz than rambunctious freebop – though it does offer some of that, too.
Bobby Hutcherson - Oblique (1967) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster UCCQ-5016}

Bobby Hutcherson - Oblique (1967) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster UCCQ-5016}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 246 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 97 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 232 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24bit 192kHz remaster
© 1967, 2014 Universal Japan / Blue Note | BN 75th The Masterworks | UCCQ-5016
Jazz / Post Bop / Vibraphone

Reissue. Features the high-fidelity SHM-CD format (fully compatible with standard CD player) and the latest remastering (24bit 192kHz). Bobby Hutcherson's second quartet session, Oblique, shares both pianist Herbie Hancock and drummer Joe Chambers with his first, Happenings (bassist Albert Stinson is a newcomer). However, the approach is somewhat different this time around. For starters, there's less emphasis on Hutcherson originals; he contributes only three of the six pieces, with one from Hancock and two from the typically free-thinking Chambers. And compared to the relatively simple compositions and reflective soloing on Happenings, Oblique is often more complex in its post-bop style and more emotionally direct (despite what the title may suggest).
Lee Morgan - The Sidewinder (1963) {2013 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster TYCJ-81011}

Lee Morgan - The Sidewinder (1963) {2013 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster TYCJ-81011}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 368 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 120 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 247 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24bit 192kHz remaster
© 1963, 2013 Universal Japan / Blue Note | BN 75th The Masterworks | TYCJ-81011
Jazz / Hard Bop / Trumpet

Features the high-fidelity SHM-CD format (fully compatible with standard CD player) and the latest remastering (24bit 192kHz). Carried by its almost impossibly infectious eponymous opening track, The Sidewinder helped foreshadow the sounds of boogaloo and soul-jazz with its healthy R&B influence and Latin tinge. While the rest of the album retreats to a more conventional hard bop sound, Morgan's compositions are forward-thinking and universally solid. Only 25 at the time of its release, Morgan was accomplished (and perhaps cocky) enough to speak of mentoring the great Joe Henderson, who at 26 was just beginning to play dates with Blue Note after getting out of the military.
Lee Morgan - The Rajah (1966) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster UCCQ-5023}

Lee Morgan - The Rajah (1966) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster UCCQ-5023}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 308 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 108 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 252 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24bit 192 kHz remaster
© 1966, 2014 Universal Japan / Blue Note | BN 75th The Masterworks | UCCQ-5023
Jazz / Hard Bop / Trumpet

Features the high-fidelity SHM-CD format (fully compatible with standard CD player) and the latest remastering (24bit 192kHz). This long-lost Lee Morgan session was not released for the first time until it was discovered in the Blue Note vaults by Michael Cuscuna in 1984; it has still not been reissued on CD. Originals by Cal Massey, Duke Pearson ("Is That So") and Walter Davis, in addition to a couple of surprising pop tunes ("What Not My Love" and "Once in My Lifetime") and Morgan's title cut, are well-played by the quintet (which includes the trumpeter/leader, Hank Mobley on tenor, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins).
Hank Mobley - Newark 1953 (2012) {2CD Set Uptown UPCD 27.66-67 rec 1953}

Hank Mobley - Newark 1953 (2012) {2CD Set Uptown UPCD 27.66-67 rec 1953}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 293 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 230 Mb
Full Artwork @ 300 dpi (jpg) -> 34 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 1953, 2012 Uptown Records | UPCD 27.66-67
Jazz / Bop / Hard Bop / Saxophone

While major jazz record labels chase the latest crossover fad with borderline jazz content and ignore historical, significant, unissued jazz performances in their vaults, smaller labels like Uptown regularly surprise jazz fans with live recordings that few knew existed at all, such as this evening taped by jazz industry veteran Ozzie Cadena. Hank Mobley is heard leading a house band with pianist Walter Davis, Jr., drummer Charlie Persip, and the obscure bassist Jimmy Schenck, with trombonist Bennie Green as the guest for the week. These two sets recorded at The Piccadilly in Newark come from a single night in 1953, making them among Mobley's earliest known recordings.
Jack Wilson - Song For My Daughter (1968) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster TYCJ-81089}

Jack Wilson - Song For My Daughter (1968) {2014 Japan SHM-CD Blue Note 24-192 Remaster TYCJ-81089}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 282 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 104 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 251 Mb | 5% repair rar | 24bit 192kHz remaster
© 1968, 2014 Universal Japan / Blue Note | BN 75th The Masterworks | TYCJ-81089
Jazz / Cool / Post Bop / Piano

Reissue. Features the high-fidelity SHM-CD format (compatible with standard CD player) and the latest 24bit 192kHz remastering. On Song for My Daughter, his third record for Blue Note, Jack Wilson "changed with the times," to paraphrase one of the record's songs. Like many of his peers on the label, Wilson pursued a pop direction as the '60s drew to a close, which meant he covered pop hits like "Scarborough Fair/Canticle" and "Stormy," and that he recorded the album with a large band augmented by a string section. It is a testament to Wilson's strengths as a pianist that he doesn't get lost in this heavy-handed setting and manages to contribute some typically graceful moments, including the lovely title song.