Crusading Warfare

Crusading Warfare, 1097-1193 (repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by Veslefrikk at Sept. 14, 2014
Crusading Warfare, 1097-1193 (repost)

Crusading Warfare, 1097-1193 By R. C. Smail
Publisher: Cambridge University Press 1995 | 320 Pages | ISBN: 0521458382 | DJVU | 2 MB

Crusading Warfare, 1097-1193  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by lout at Feb. 8, 2010
Crusading Warfare, 1097-1193

Crusading Warfare, 1097-1193 By R. C. Smail
Publisher: Cambridge University Press 1995 | 320 Pages | ISBN: 0521458382 | DJVU | 2 MB

Women, Crusading and the Holy Land in Historical Narrative (Warfare in History)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by chestr at Feb. 9, 2010
Women, Crusading and the Holy Land in Historical Narrative (Warfare in History)

By Natasha R. Hodgson, "Women, Crusading and the Holy Land in Historical Narrative (Warfare in History)"
Publisher: Boydell Press | 2007-11-15 | ISBN 1843833328 | PDF | 304 pages | 1.6 MB

Narratives of crusading have often been overlooked as a source for the history of women because of their focus on martial events, and perceptions about women inhibiting the recruitment and progress of crusading armies. Yet women consistently appeared in the histories of crusade and settlement, performing a variety of roles. While some were vilified as 'useless mouths' or prostitutes, others undertook menial tasks for the army, went on crusade with retinues of their own knights, and rose to political prominence in the Levant and and the West. This book compares perceptions of women from a wide range of historical narratives including those eyewitness accounts, lay histories and monastic chronicles that pertained to major crusade expeditions and the settler society in the Holy Land. It addresses how authors used events involving women and stereotypes based on gender, family role, and social status in writing their histories: how they blended historia and fabula, speculated on women's motivations, and occasionally granted them a literary voice in order to connect with their audience, impart moral advice, and justify the crusade ideal. Dr NATASHA R. HODGSON teaches at Nottingham Trent University.

Warfare in Medieval Europe, c.400–c.1453  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by readerXXI at July 8, 2017
Warfare in Medieval Europe, c.400–c.1453

Warfare in Medieval Europe, c.400–c.1453
by Bernard S. Bachrach and David Bachrach
English | 2017 | ISBN: 1138887668 | 445 Pages | PDF | 8 MB
Arms and Armour of the Crusading Era, 1050-1350: Western Europe and the Crusader States (Repost)

David Nicolle - Arms and Armour of the Crusading Era, 1050-1350: Western Europe and the Crusader States
Greenhill Books | 1999 | ISBN: 1853673471 | English | 537 Pages | PDF | 95.04 MB

Crusading as an Act of Vengeance, 1095-1216  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by ksveta6 at Jan. 12, 2017
Crusading as an Act of Vengeance, 1095-1216

Crusading as an Act of Vengeance, 1095-1216 by Susanna A. Throop
2011 | ISBN: 0754665828 | English | 242 pages | EPUB | 2 MB

Logistics of Warfare in the Age of the Crusades  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by viserion at Sept. 30, 2016
Logistics of Warfare in the Age of the Crusades

John H. Pryor, "Logistics of Warfare in the Age of the Crusades"
ISBN: 0754651975 | 2006 | PDF | 400 pages | 19 MB

Crusading and the Crusader States (Repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by elodar at July 5, 2015
Crusading and the Crusader States (Repost)

Andrew Jotischky, "Crusading and the Crusader States"
English | 2004-10-15 | ISBN: 0582418518 | 336 pages | EPUB, MOBI | 4.63 mb + 5.49 mb

Crusading and the Crusader States  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by ksveta6 at Aug. 9, 2014
Crusading and the Crusader States

Crusading and the Crusader States by Andrew Jotischky
2004 | ISBN: 0582418518 | English | 336 pages | EPUB | 5 MB

Crusading as an Act of Vengeance, 1095-1216 (repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by interes at May 17, 2014
Crusading as an Act of Vengeance, 1095-1216 (repost)

Crusading as an Act of Vengeance, 1095-1216 by Susanna A. Throop
English | 2011 | ISBN-10: 0754665828 | 240 pages | PDF | 2,7 MB

Only recently have historians of the crusades begun to seriously investigate the presence of the idea of crusading as an act of vengeance, despite its frequent appearance in crusading sources. Understandably, many historians have primarily concentrated on non-ecclesiastical phenomena such as feuding, purportedly a component of 'secular' culture and the interpersonal obligations inherent in medieval society.