Souvenance

Anouar Brahem - Souvenance: Music for Oud, Quartet & String Orchestra (2014) [2CD] {ECM}

Anouar Brahem Souvenance: Music for Oud, Quartet & String Orchestra (2014) [2CD] {ECM}
EAC rip (secure mode) | FLAC (tracks)+CUE+LOG -> 325 Mb | MP3 @320 -> 213 Mb
Full Artwork @ 600 dpi (png) -> 365 Mb | 5% repair rar
© 2014 ECM Records | ECM 2423/24
Jazz / Contemporary Jazz / Avant-Garde Music / Middle Eastern Traditions / Oud

The music of Souvenance, by turns graceful, hypnotic, and taut and starkly dramatic, was recorded in 2014 – six years after oud-master Anouar Brahem’s last ECM album, The Astounding Eyes of Rita. “It took a long time to write this music,” he acknowledges, noting that his emotional world had been usurped by the unfolding story of political upheaval sweeping first through Tunisia then through the neighbouring countries. Extraordinary waves of change, accompanied by great hopes and fears. “I don’t claim a direct link between my compositions and the events taking place in Tunisia,” says Anouar, “but I have been deeply affected by them.”
Anouar Brahem - Souvenance (2014) [Official Digital Download 24bit/96kHz]

Anouar Brahem - Souvenance (2014)
FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz | Time - 89:04 minutes | 1,59 GB
Studio Master, Official Digital Download | Artwork: Digital booklet

The music of Souvenance, by turns graceful, hypnotic, austere, and starkly dramatic, follows Tunisian oud-master Anouar Brahem’s last ECM album, The Astounding Eyes of Rita after a five-year gap. “It took a long time to write this music,” he acknowledges. Early plans to document the progress of the “Rita” quartet, which had grown to become a compellingly dynamic group in concert, were set aside. “I was feeling a need to attempt something new.” Then, at the end of 2010 and the beginning of 2011, came the great political upheavals – accompanied by “immense fears, joys and hopes” – which began in Tunisia and swept like wildfire through the region. Fully absorbed by daily news of popular uprisings, collapsing dictatorships, insurgencies and counter-insurgencies, Brahem found his emotional world “monopolized by the political”. It was not the right moment to be writing music: “I had to wait for the pressure to fall, before I could resume work”.