Ethic in University

Daniel T. Rodgers "The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920" (Repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by s13tas at March 8, 2011
Daniel T. Rodgers "The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920" (Repost)

Daniel T. Rodgers "The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920" (Repost)
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press | ISBN: 0226723526 | edition 1979 | PDF | 318 pages | 29,09 mb

"Rodgers's book is a study of how technology affects ideas. That is the issue to which Rodgers always returns: how did men and women react to the economy of unprecedented plenty that the 19th-century revolution in power and machines had produced?
Universities in the Flux of Time: An exploration of time and temporality in university life

Universities in the Flux of Time: An exploration of time and temporality in university life by Paul Gibbs and Oili-Helena Ylijoki
English | 2014 | ISBN: 0415732220, 0415732239 | 222 pages | PDF + EPUB | 0,9 + 2,2 MB

The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by AvaxGenius at May 1, 2017
The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany

The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany: Civic Duty and the Right of Arms By B. Ann Tlusty
English | PDF | 387 Pages | 2011 | ISBN : 1349366471 | 13.49 MB

For German townsmen, life during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was characterized by a culture of arms, with urban citizenry representing the armed power of the state. This book investigates how men were socialized to the martial ethic from all sides, and how masculine identity was confirmed with blades and guns.

No Longer Invisible: Religion in University Education  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by interes at Aug. 2, 2015
No Longer Invisible: Religion in University Education

No Longer Invisible: Religion in University Education by Rhonda Hustedt Jacobsen and Douglas Jacobsen
English | 2012 | ISBN: 0199844739 | 208 pages | PDF | 1,3 MB
The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany: Civic Duty and the Right of Arms by B. Ann Tlusty

The Martial Ethic in Early Modern Germany: Civic Duty and the Right of Arms by B. Ann Tlusty
English | May 15, 2011 | ISBN: 0230576567 | 384 Pages | PDF | 3.3 MB
Developing Learning Professionals: Integrating Experiences in University and Practice Settings (repost)

Developing Learning Professionals: Integrating Experiences in University and Practice Settings by Stephen Billett and Amanda J. Henderson
English | 2011-02-14 | ISBN: 9048139368 | PDF | 240 pages | 2 MB

Sustainable Design: Towards a New Ethic in Architecture and Town Planning  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by tukotikko at Jan. 4, 2015
Sustainable Design: Towards a New Ethic in Architecture and Town Planning

Sustainable Design: Towards a New Ethic in Architecture and Town Planning By Marie-Helene Contal-Chavannes, Jana Revedin, Elizabeth Kugler
2009 | 184 Pages | ISBN: 3764399384 | PDF | 38 MB

The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920 (repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by libr at Feb. 18, 2014
The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920 (repost)

The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920 by Daniel T. Rodgers
English | ISBN: 0226723526 | edition 1979 | PDF | 316 pages | 29 mb

"Rodgers's book is a study of how technology affects ideas. That is the issue to which Rodgers always returns: how did men and women react to the economy of unprecedented plenty that the 19th-century revolution in power and machines had produced? . . .
Developing Learning Professionals: Integrating Experiences in University and Practice Settings [Repost]

Stephen Billett, Amanda Henderson - Developing Learning Professionals: Integrating Experiences in University and Practice Settings
Published: 2011-02-14 | ISBN: 9048139368 | PDF | 240 pages | 3 MB

The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920 (repost)  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by interes at April 13, 2013
The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920 (repost)

Daniel T. Rodgers "The Work Ethic in Industrial America, 1850-1920"
English | ISBN: 0226723526 | edition 1979 | PDF | 316 pages | 29 mb

"Rodgers's book is a study of how technology affects ideas. That is the issue to which Rodgers always returns: how did men and women react to the economy of unprecedented plenty that the 19th-century revolution in power and machines had produced? . . .