Ipam

IP Address Management Principles and Practice (repost)

IP Address Management Principles and Practice by Timothy Rooney
English | 2011-01-11 | ISBN: 0470585870 | 429 pages | PDF | 4.4 mb

This book will be the first covering the subject of IP address management (IPAM). The practice of IPAM includes the application of network management disciplines to IP address space and associated network services, namely DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and DNS (Domain Name System).

IP Address Management Principles and Practice (repost)  

Posted by interes at Oct. 4, 2012
IP Address Management Principles and Practice (repost)

Timothy Rooney, "IP Address Management Principles and Practice"
English | 2011-01-11 | ISBN: 0470585870 | 429 pages | PDF | 4.47 mb

This book will be the first covering the subject of IP address management (IPAM). The practice of IPAM includes the application of network management disciplines to IP address space and associated network services, namely DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and DNS (Domain Name System). The consequence of inaccurately configuring DHCP is that end users may not be able to obtain IP addresses to access the network. Without proper DNS configuration, usability of the network will greatly suffer as the name-to-address lookup process may fail. Imagine having to navigate to a website or send an email or an instant message by IP address instead of by name! It's equally important that these DHCP and DNS configurations be based on a common IP address plan, which maps out the IP address hierarchy, subnets, address pools, and domains.
"IP Address Management Principles and Practice" by Timothy Rooney

"IP Address Management Principles and Practice" by Timothy Rooney
IEEE Press Series on Network Management
Wiley-IEEE Press | January 2011 | ISBN: 0470585870 | 429 pages | PDF/djvu | 5 MB

This book will be the first covering the subject of IP address management (IPAM). The practice of IPAM includes the application of network management disciplines to IP address space and associated network services, namely DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and DNS (Domain Name System). The consequence of inaccurately configuring DHCP is that end users may not be able to obtain IP addresses to access the network. Without proper DNS configuration, usability of the network will greatly suffer as the name-to-address lookup process may fail. Imagine having to navigate to a website or send an email or an instant message by IP address instead of by name! It's equally important that these DHCP and DNS configurations be based on a common IP address plan, which maps out the IP address hierarchy, subnets, address pools, and domains.