Saffron

Saffron: Crocus sativus L. (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants - Industrial Profiles) by Moshe Negbi

Saffron: Crocus sativus L. (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants - Industrial Profiles) by Moshe Negbi
Publisher: CRC Press; 1 edition (June 23, 1999) | ISBN: 9057023946 | Pages: 148 | PDF | 7.7 MB

Saffron is an important spice of high economic value. Used as a dye, and in the cosmetic industry, some interesting medicinal properties have recently been attributed to this genus. The book covers the research on the cultivation and genetic improvement of Saffron and all aspects on the botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and cultivation of the species. For two decades saffron specialists explored methods of improving its cultivation in the field and also in vitro. This research has resulted in a comprehensive and contemporary overview of saffron (Crocus Sativus L.) which will be of great interest to all concerned with the study and use of spices and medicinal plants.

The Saffron Tales: Recipes from the Persian Kitchen  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by ksveta6 at Dec. 5, 2016
The Saffron Tales: Recipes from the Persian Kitchen

The Saffron Tales: Recipes from the Persian Kitchen by Yasmin Khan
2016 | ISBN: 1632867109, 1408868733 | English | 240 pages | EPUB/AZW3 | 13 MB/14 MB
Saffron: Crocus sativus L. (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants - Industrial Profiles) (repost)

Saffron: Crocus sativus L. (Medicinal and Aromatic Plants - Industrial Profiles) by Moshe Negbi
Publisher: CRC Press; 1 edition (June 23, 1999) | ISBN: 9057023946 | Pages: 148 | PDF | 7 MB

Saffron Sands - Frozen Delight  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by naag at Feb. 20, 2015
Saffron Sands - Frozen Delight

Saffron Sands - Frozen Delight
Forbidden Fruit | 2014 | English | ASIN: B005TWTP0U | 13 Pages | EPUB | 0.1 MB

Saffron Sands - Erotic Shorts  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by naag at Dec. 25, 2014
Saffron Sands - Erotic Shorts

Saffron Sands - Erotic Shorts
Forbidden Fruit | English | 2013 | ASIN: B00FO6AZFA | 38 pages | EPUB | 0.2 MB

The Hare Krishna Movement: The Postcharismatic Fate of a Religious Transplant  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by stabiq at March 13, 2016
The Hare Krishna Movement: The Postcharismatic Fate of a Religious Transplant

The Hare Krishna Movement: The Postcharismatic Fate of a Religious Transplant by Edwin Bryant and Maria Ekstrand
2004 | PDF | 496 pages | ISBN-10: 023112256X | English | 1.6 MB

Dancing and chanting with their shaven heads and saffron robes, Hare Krishnas presented the most visible face of any of the eastern religions transplanted to the West during the sixties and seventies. Yet few people know much about them.

Amazigh Arts in Morocco: Women Shaping Berber Identity  eBooks & eLearning

Posted by rexT at July 27, 2009
Amazigh Arts in Morocco: Women Shaping Berber Identity

Amazigh Arts in Morocco: Women Shaping Berber Identity
Cynthia Becker | ISBN: 0292712952 | PDF | 241 pages | 2006 | 7 MB

In southeastern Morocco, around the oasis of Tafilalet, the Ait Khabbash people weave brightly coloured carpets, embroider indigo head coverings, paint their faces with saffron, and wear ornate jewellery. Their extraordinarily detailed arts are rich in cultural symbolism; they are always breathtakingly beautiful - and they are typically made by women. Like other Amazigh (Berber) groups (but in contrast to the Arab societies of North Africa), the Ait Khabbash have entrusted their artistic responsibilities to women. Cynthia Becker spent years in Morocco living among these women and, through family connections and female fellowship, achieved unprecedented access to the artistic rituals of the Ait Khabbash. The result is more than a stunning examination of the arts themselves; it is also an illumination of women's roles in Islamic North Africa and the many ways in which women negotiate complex social and religious issues. One of the reasons Amazigh women are artists is that the arts are expressions of ethnic identity, and it follows that the guardians of Amazigh identity ought to be those who literally ensure its continuation from generation to generation, the Amazigh women. Not surprisingly, the arts are visual expressions of womanhood, and fertility symbols are prevalent.